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TransCanada – CSR – Environment: TransCanada’s GTN natural gas pipeline crosses the Pend Oreille River in Idaho. We worked to safely and successfully re-establish river bed support under our pipeline. TransCanada – CSR – Environment: TransCanada’s GTN natural gas pipeline crosses the Pend Oreille River in Idaho. We worked to safely and successfully re-establish river bed support under our pipeline.

MINIMIZING OUR FOOTPRINT | Environment

Land and Biodiversity

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As part of our commitment to environmental stewardship, we work to minimize our environmental footprint as we strive to meet the energy needs of North Americans.

Examples of significant finds on TransCanada projects:

  • A 7,000-year-old bison kill site above the Battle River in central Alberta
  • An extremely rare collection of over 200 Clovis artifacts dating back 13,000 years near Lily Lake, B.C.
  • A post classic period residential and ceremonial site in the Sierra Gorda region of Mexico

We’re committed to protecting the environment throughout the complete life cycle of our assets, from business development to project planning and design, through construction and reclamation to operations and final decommissioning.

At TransCanada, we believe that when we build an asset, we temporarily borrow the land.

Project planning

To minimize effects of our projects on the surrounding environment, TransCanada completes a detailed environmental assessment.

Depending on the type and scale of the project, the environmental assessments:

  • may include extensive field studies examining existing natural resources along the proposed project footprint
  • include engagement with Indigenous communities, landowners, local residents and other stakeholders to identify and understand their use of the lands and any additional unique environmental concerns
  • provide opportunities for the identification and study of heritage resources – archeological sites, historical sites and paleontological sites (fossils) – across large areas
  • are used in design considerations, including pipeline route selection and facility site selection, and to inform project-specific environmental protection plans

Reclamation

Once our projects are constructed, TransCanada reclaims the land to maintain equivalent land capability and re-establish the land’s biodiversity.

Over the course of our 65-year history, TransCanada has successfully reclaimed hundreds of thousands of acres of land in many different ecological regions following pipeline construction and other facility construction throughout North America.

Operations

Our commitment to the protection of the land does not end with successful reclamation after construction.

Post-construction monitoring is conducted to confirm the effectiveness of mitigation strategies, reclamation and habitat restoration activities.

During operations and throughout the life of our assets, TransCanada follows a comprehensive environmental governance process anchored by an environmental management program and continues to collaborate with landowners, communities, Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders, respecting the cultural and environmental aspects of the lands we operate within.