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TransCanada 2014 CSR Report — Society: Landowners engaging in conversation at a table with a TransCanada representative TransCanada 2014 CSR Report — Society: Landowners engaging in conversation at a table with a TransCanada representative

2014 CSR | Society

Indigenous Peoples Engaging Indigenous Communities

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TransCanada is committed to meaningful engagement. We do this by supporting each community’s interests as we engage regarding our activities. TransCanada employs engagement processes which vary depending on the nature, scope and location of each project and the individual concerns and interests of each community.

Commitment of resources to enable project review supports fair, inclusive participation. We recognize Aboriginal traditional knowledge as valuable contributions that inform our project planning and mitigation strategies.

The support of community-led traditional use studies and 363 Aboriginal participants who took part in 5,331 days of field studies over three years on the North Montney Mainline Project illustrates our commitment to meaningful engagement.

Project agreements that frame ongoing community relationships are designed to meet the individual circumstances of each community and are another way we demonstrate our commitment to mutually built partnerships.

Indigenous Engagement Highlights

  • TransCanada acknowledges the unique governance of Indigenous communities, their relationship to the land and legal standing through agreements that form the basis for a respectful and ongoing relationship with communities potentially affected by our activities.
  • TransCanada has engaged with more than 300 Indigenous communities in the US and Canada.
  • Five graduates from the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne (MCA) Archaeological Field School monitoring program were hired as members of the field crews that completed the Stage 2 and 3 archaeological field studies for the Eastern Mainline Project. The five participants spent a total of 897 hours in the field.
  • In the U.S., the Native American Relations Team has organized tours to see pump station operations with Tribal leaders and members and municipal leaders, providing first-hand observation of facilities in operation.
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INDIGENOUS PEOPLES / Engaging Indigenous Communities